Shocking mum: 'I'll breastfeed my son into his teens!'

Francine Anker By Francine Anker Closer Staff

Most mums give up breastfeeding when their baby is about six months, but Amanda Hurst is still going, despite her son being five years old

Most mums give up breastfeeding when their baby is about six months, but Amanda Hurst is still going, despite her son being five years old.

Jonathan has a full set of teeth and has started school but still suckles mum Amanda, who even wet-nurses other children.

“I’m proud to still be breastfeeding my son,” says 28-year-old childminder Amanda. “It’s natural, no matter how old the child is.

“I’m proud to still be breastfeeding my son,” says 28-year-old childminder Amanda. “It’s natural, no matter how old the child is.

“I thought it was weird when I first saw a toddler breastfeeding at a postnatal class. But when I had Jonathan I understood – the bond is amazing. And I’ve got more than enough to go round so I’m happy to feed other children.”

She adds: “Jonathan will want it less as he grows up, but right now he loves it. And I’m happy to go on, even when he’s a teenager!”

Amanda, who’s six months pregnant with another baby boy, breastfeeds Jonathan every other day, even though he eats three proper meals a day. She says: “He used to breastfeed more often, which meant feeding him in public. I got some disgusted looks from strangers, but I ignored them.”

Amanda admits when Jonathan was three he refused to breastfeed in public.

“We were at the library when he started crying and I assumed he wanted feeding, but he asked if we could wait until we got home,” recalls Amanda from Barnsley. “Now he only likes me to breastfeed him when we’re alone at home as he associates it with being relaxed. We call it ‘lellow’ in front of strangers, which is less embarrassing than ‘boobie.’ I don’t worry about him being teased at school because none of his friends know.”

She adds: “He understands it’s a treat, like chocolate, but I feed him whenever he asks. Now I’m pregnant he says it’s extra creamy.

“It can be painful if he doesn’t latch on properly, but he knows to be gentle.”

 Amanda has full support from her store supervisor husband Roy, 31. He says: “I’m all for freedom of choice in how a parent brings up their child. Society’s pressure to conform shouldn’t interfere with breastfeeding.”

Amanda is so convinced about the health benefits of breast milk that she’s happy to offer it as part of her childminding service. She first breastfed another mum’s child in 2008.

She recalls: “I was looking after a two-month-old boy who was crying and wouldn’t stop. I called his mother and asked if I could breastfeed him. She was shocked, but I told her there was no harm in it and she agreed. It felt strange but I enjoyed it, and the baby soon stopped crying.

“I was looking after a two-month-old boy who was crying and wouldn’t stop. I called his mother and asked if I could breastfeed him."

“After, I offered to do it again so his mum wouldn’t have to worry about expressing milk. When the other mums I childmind for heard about it, they were happy for me to do it. Only one mum refused my offer.

“One mum has offered to be my new baby’s wet nurse. I wouldn’t give my baby to any woman’s breast – I’d have to know them and trust them. Things like HIV, hepatitis B and C and herpes can be passed through breastmilk, but every pregnant women has tests for everything. I’m looking forward to us feeding my children in tandem, and it will give me the chance to go out on my own for the day or go for a proper sleep.”

Amanda and Roy have even tried her milk themselves. She says: “It’s a bit bitter but drinkable. Roy thought it was nice."